About Sarah El-Richani

Sarah El-Richani is a doctoral student from Lebanon researching the Lebanese media system from a comparative perspective.

Articles by Sarah El-Richani

This week's guest editors

The birth pangs of Qatar’s art scene

In which the claim by Yes Minister’s Sir Humphrey that, “subsidy is not to be given for what the people want! It is for what the people don't want but ought to have!” resonates in Qatar.  

Lebanese women and full citizenship rights: a mesh of patriarchy, politics and confessionalism

Despite some grandstanding by high-ranking politicians stating that Lebanese women should have full citizenship rights, these promises, needless to say, have so far come to nothing.

Doha debate reveals gulf between locals, its elite and expatriates

While more and more Qataris seem to be expressing their disapproval or disquiet not only in the Majalis but also in the wider public sphere, it would be naive to speak of further liberalisation of the liberalised autocracy.

Al-Assir: the runaway sheikh

In the wake of this episode, the Lebanese are well aware of the aphorism attributed to Trotsky, “you may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you”.

Fitna at the gates

Despite it all, Hezbollah remains a key constituent of the weak and de-facto decentralised state - the legitimate representative of the overwhelming majority of Lebanese Shiites and the ally of the largest Christian Party in the country.

Syria and pressing concerns for the region

While the Geneva talks, if they are actually held, are tipped to fail, a political settlement may well be the only hope, not only for Syria, but also for the region. 

Lebanon tempts fate

While a protracted civil conflict in Lebanon is unlikely, a clash between Hezbollah and Israel is only too feasible.

 

Middle East football scores own goal

The intermingling of sports, politics and identity in the region makes it too important to be overlooked.

 

Art attack: Syria's artists under fire

The poet Adonis who has called on Assad to cede power to what initially began as peaceful protests, was also the subject of sectarian0-fuelled online death threats for his criticism of the rebels’ transgressions and his position against regional and international intervention.

Sidon’s Salafist Sheikh: the roar of the Sunni lion

Heightened security has so far managed to contain the Sheikh’s roving and provocative marches.


Spectre of the Syrian spillover haunts Lebanon

It was only a matter of time before Hezbollah would also join in the fight out of loyalty to a regime dubbed by David Hirst its “midwife”, as well as in an effort to protect its supply routes.

Lebanon: the right to civil marriage and the frenzied fatwa

Rather than fly to nearby Cyprus to tie the knot, Nidal Darwiche and Khouloud Sukkarieh, supported by lawyer Talal Husseini, have attempted to force through the first civil marriage carried out on Lebanese soil.

Yemen: Saleh’s final dance

There are many different strands to the protest under way in Yemen, including old and new grievances, and signs that some of them are coming together.

Lebanon: long live the settlement, the settlement is dead

Public opinion is deeply divided in Lebanon after renewed diplomatic efforts faltered in reaching a settlement over decisions of who will be Prime Minister, as well as the imminent Special Tribunal for Lebanon indictment

Lebanese consensus-building: weathering a tempest

With the Special Tribunal of Lebanon indictment for the assassination of former PM Rafik Hariri set to be issued ‘very, very soon’, the weary and the wary in Lebanon are holding their breath.
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