Doubling down on human rights data

NGOs have often resisted social science methods, but random sampling and public opinion survey data can help us understand what people actually think and want. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human RightsEspañolFrançaisРу́сский

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Data-driven optimism on global rights

Opinion polls across four world regions suggest that human rights activists can be cautiously optimistic—the public likes and trusts them. The openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human Rights.   EspañolFrançais, العربية

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Doubling down on human rights data

NGOs have often resisted social science methods, but random sampling and public opinion survey data can help us understand what people actually think and want. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human RightsEspañolFrançaisРу́сский

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Data-driven optimism on global rights

Opinion polls across four world regions suggest that human rights activists can be cautiously optimistic—the public likes and trusts them. The openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human Rights.   EspañolFrançais, العربية

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Iceland's unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason

The award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution', discusses with Phil England the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution.

Warehousing Palestine

The Israeli state ‘warehouses’ Palestinians in Gaza for many of the same reasons that the United States has historically incarcerated a disproportionate amount of African Americans.

Why Roma migrate

Almost all central and east European Roma migrants to western Europe are not trafficked. They seek opportunities denied at home and escape from the racism perpetuating their marginalisation.

California’s drought: the canary in the coalmine?

There is no place on earth that can be safe, secure or healthy in a world that is running out of water.

Devolution, for and against: a tale of many cities

The debate on devolution has become increasingly remote from democratic participation. It needs to be opened up.

The symbolism of NO in Greece

Why getting Greeks to vote NO may be easier than getting them to vote YES.

 

Why I will be voting NO in Sunday's Greek referendum

In its essence, Sunday's question is one of dignity and our lives from this point on.

On Arab Awakening: a response

Can the mass uprisings that happened across the Arab world in 2011 accurately be called an awakening? The editors of Arab Awakening defend the title of their section, while admitting that it may be time to move on.

After Baku, let's not forget about human rights

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With the European Games in Baku over, what does the future hold for Europe's relationship with Azerbaijan?

 

Syria’s refugees: a global responsibility

Unless the Syrian refugee emergency is treated as a truly global responsibility, we cannot expect hard-pressed countries in the region to maintain the generosity they have demonstrated since the crisis erupted.  

On 'Arab Awakening'

What's in a name? A critical look at our choice of page title some years after the so called Arab Spring.

Doubling down on human rights data

NGOs have often resisted social science methods, but random sampling and public opinion survey data can help us understand what people actually think and want. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human RightsEspañolFrançaisРу́сский

Does it matter when polls go wrong?

When political polls go wrong, many people start to doubt polling entirely. But that’s a costly mistake. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human Rights.

Data-driven optimism for global rights activists

Opinion polls across four world regions suggest that human rights activists can be cautiously optimistic—the public likes and trusts them. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Public Opinion and Human Rights.   EspañolFrançais, العربية

Europe as a republic: the story of Europe in the twenty first century

We all are Europe! Europe is now almost completely integrated in terms of economic and monetary policy. European integration is thus yesterday’s word; tomorrow’s is European democracy. Deutsch. (8,907 words)

Europe in the 21st century: a new version of Europe is available (short resumé)

“No idea is a good idea unless it first appears to be completely illusory.” (Albert Einstein)

Polly Toynbee, Jeremy Corbyn and the limits of acceptable politics

If anyone is "out of touch" with British public opinion it is not Jeremy Corbyn, but the liberal intelligentsia. 

Europe: a new version is available

We are outraged. We see Europe falling apart in front of our very eyes. Europe is in dire need of radical change in social, financial and energy policies and more. Join us.

The hidden injuries of caste: south Indian tea workers and economic crisis

Economic crisis has pushed Indian tea workers to seek employment outside the plantations, forcing them to re-engage with the caste hierarchy from which their ancestors attempted to escape. 

Adivasis in India: modern-day slaves or modern-day workers?

India’s Adivasis often work in conditions commonly described as ‘modern-day slavery’, but they are not slaves. Their unfreedom is both the fuel and product of modern Indian capitalism.

Rebuilding democracy in Iceland: an interview with Birgitta Jonsdottir

In the first of a series of interviews by Phil England examining the situation in Iceland and the possible relevance of developments there to the UK, Phil talks to Pirate Party MP Birgitta Jonsdottir.

Welcome to the empathy wars

Stepping into other people’s shoes has been a catalytic force for social change throughout human history.

Mexico's 2015 Elections - A citizen triumph?

The congressional and local elections on June 7 produced some surprising victories.  Mexico's electoral map is changing. Perhaps for the first time, the people are finding their voice. Español

The geopolitical implications of Europe’s debt crisis

Up until very recently, geopolitics was one of the most unpopular and outdated intellectual concepts in contemporary Europe. The eurocrisis has changed that.

Referendum and democracy: putting the demos on stage

The referendum takes the lesson of the squares to the heart of politics. The stakes are high: Greek destiny, the future of the European Union and of democracy is on the line.

The citizen revolutions in Latin America

The countries of the ‘citizen revolution’ in Latin America are post-neoliberal, but not post-capitalist.

We need an ICJ ruling on Syria

Getting the world’s most respected judicial body to weigh in on Syria might not stop the regime from bombing civilians, but it will increase the political cost of continued attacks.

Turkey’s election and the Kurdish peace process: what now?

The post-election landscape in Turkey raises new challenges in the search for a lasting settlement of the conflict between Turks and Kurds.

The United Nations and a peace process strategy for Syria

A NOREF policy brief providing a series of recommendations for the development of a peacemkaing strategy for Syria, led by the UN with support from key countries.

The utter failure of the international community to protect civilians in Syria

The Syrian people need an immediate no-fly zone, and for the alternatives to IS/Da'esh and Assad to be taken seriously.