Skeletons in the Turkish closet: remembering the Armenian Genocide

Just like the skeletons that were discovered in Diyarbakır in 2012 nearly 100 years after they were buried, Turkey’s past is haunting its future and demanding that we remember the tragic events of the Armenian Genocide.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Skeletons in the Turkish closet: remembering the Armenian Genocide

Just like the skeletons that were discovered in Diyarbakır in 2012 nearly 100 years after they were buried, Turkey’s past is haunting its future and demanding that we remember the tragic events of the Armenian Genocide.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

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Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Always historicize!

The proper way for radicals to conceive of their activism is in terms of the speeding up of current historical trends, not their interruption or reversal.

A very European coup

This is why Syriza's negotiating strategy has to play to the European gallery and not just to the suits in the conference room. The aim is to persuade people to put pressure on their own governments or change them in the coming elections.

Who is your phone talking to?

“The Secret Life of your Mobile Phone” is a stage show dedicated to probing how smartphones leak private information. Why are our phones so sneaky?

The Armenian Genocide and the law

The law, in particular the Law of Abandoned Properties, became the Ottoman Empire's most important tool during the Armenian Genocide a century ago. Economic interests blinded people to the plight of their fellows who were made to disappear. 

Securitisation not the response to deaths at sea

The European Union has responded to the humanitarian crisis presented by refugee deaths in the Mediterranean—but only through the lens of border control.

The BBC Trust: a work in progress

A chorus of critics is calling for the abolition of the BBC Trust. Yes, it may be flawed but this body could yet be reformed to fulfil its public service function.

After Tunis. What next for the World Social Forum?

One of the arguments is that as the crisis has hit the North, it is time for South-based activists to travel to teach their northern comrades how to deal with debt crisis and precarity.

Russia's short-termism in the Middle East

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Is the Ukraine conflict shifting Russia's Middle Eastern policy from real strategy to scoring cheap points?

 

The irreplaceables in Central Asia

924055_0.jpgIn Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, the authorities don’t even have to stuff the ballot boxes, their presidents have done everything they can to appear irreplaceable.

Ten ideas to transform our economy

As the General Election approaches, we desperately need to expand our discussion of 'the economy.' Here's a start.

How many people have to die before we start talking responsibly about immigration?

Last week’s deaths in the Mediterranean were directly linked to xenophobic politics in Britain.  

Small steps forward? International pressure and accountability for atrocities in Sri Lanka

In countries like Sri Lanka – not party to the ICC – international pressure plays an important role in keeping a focus on the issue of accountability for mass atrocities. A contribution to the openGlobalRights’ debate on the ICCEspañolFrançais

Creating peace: a manifesto for the 21st century

How does an international women’s organisation with a hundred year history put Mahatma Gandhi’s famous call to action into practice in 2015? Marion Bowman reports from the centenary congress of WILPF

Defending the Defenders: a daunting challenge

Women human rights defenders are under attack. The Nobel Women's Initiative conference convenes today to deepen the understanding of the risks, and to develop strategies to strengthen efforts to defend the defenders.

Wheels on the ground: women’s ‘peace train’ to The Hague

The women who have come to the WILPF conference in the Hague from Australia and Aotearoa- New Zealand, say that travelling with your feet on the ground, or at least with your wheels on the track, is the road to peace.

Turkey and the Armenian genocide: the next century

For the Armenian diaspora, today is Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day—but not in Turkey. Perhaps members of the country’s Kurdish minority can help shake up a polarised narrative.

Skeletons in the Turkish closet: remembering the Armenian Genocide

Just like the skeletons that were discovered in Diyarbakır in 2012 nearly 100 years after they were buried, Turkey’s past is haunting its future and demanding that we remember the tragic events of the Armenian Genocide.

Bigger than the World Cup: state-sponsored human trafficking in the Gulf states

Recent attention to the plight of migrant workers in Qatar is welcome, but the problems of trafficking and forced labour in the Middle East are endemic.

To stop the age of extinction, nature needs a new pronoun

Calling the natural world ‘it’ absolves us of moral responsibility and opens the door to exploitation. 

Mediterranean dreams, climate realities

The drowning of would-be migrants attempting to reach Europe is a humanitarian tragedy that reflects a growing crisis of environmental security.

Recognising and denying Armenian losses in Cyprus

Cyprus was one of the first countries to recognise the Armenian genocide, but the relationship that the country has with its own Armenian population is more complicated than it seems.

A fork in the road for Labour

Rather than clutching at the straws of what is clearly a rapidly deteriorating two-party structure, Labour should reconnect with its radical politics in a ‘progressive alliance’.

Prohibiting autonomous weapons systems

They have been dubbed ‘killer robots’. Concerted international action is needed to prevent the emergence of weapons which could operate without meaningful human control.

A genocide of our own: Bulgaria and the memory of Ottoman Armenians

In Bulgaria, Armenian communities have thrived since the fifth century and found refuge there during Ottoman massacres. So why has Bulgaria yet to officially recognise the Armenian genocide?

Violence is not inevitable: It is a choice

In 1915 a thousand women met in the Hague to demand an end to war. A thousand women are doing so again this week. It is time the women were heard and their vision shared.

In new gods do we trust?

Do you expect the machine to solve the problems? In this wide-ranging interview with the Director of the Open Rights Group we discuss bulk collection, state bureaucracies, the pre-crime era and trust.

Democratically controlled, co-operative higher education

Higher education is disintegrating under misguided neo-liberal reforms. Could co-operative universities, member-run and member-led, be the answer?

At the margins of visibility: recognising women human rights defenders

Every small act that stands up to patriarchy or to inequality, whether it is asking to go to school, or refusing to marry the man her father chooses, is an act of women's human rights defense.

Women human rights defenders: protecting each other

With the continued failure of the UN to implement the Declaration on Human Rights Defenders twenty years after it was passed, women human rights defenders are still their own best support and protection network.   

The distance travelled: Beijing, Hillary, and women's rights

Hillary Rodham Clinton will need to listen to listen to the voices of women working at grassroots on the frontline, and be prepared to use her power, should she win, to defend the human rights defenders.