Barbara, tagged and monitored like a criminal

Barbara is an asylum seeker living in the UK. How the government’s immigration crackdown creates opportunities for humiliation and profit.

Barbara, tagged and monitored like a criminal

Barbara is an asylum seeker living in the UK. How the government’s immigration crackdown creates opportunities for humiliation and profit.

Priorities of the people: an interview with Iceland's Citizens Foundation

Phil England interviews Gunnar Grimsson and Robert Bjarnson of the Citizens Foundation, pioneers of an open-source software platform, Your Priorities, which allows citizens to develop ideas to improve their areas and take more control of public spending.

Intergenerational and gender-based inequality: before and after the crisis

The new Conservative government is persisting with billions of pounds of cuts despite rising evidence of poverty and inequality, particularly for young people, children and women.

Barbara, tagged and monitored like a criminal

Barbara is an asylum seeker living in the UK. How the government’s immigration crackdown creates opportunities for humiliation and profit.

Iceland's unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason

The award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution', discusses with Phil England the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution.

Devolution, for and against: a tale of many cities

The debate on devolution has become increasingly remote from democratic participation. It needs to be opened up.

Polly Toynbee, Jeremy Corbyn and the limits of acceptable politics

If anyone is "out of touch" with British public opinion it is not Jeremy Corbyn, but the liberal intelligentsia. 

Rebuilding democracy in Iceland: an interview with Birgitta Jonsdottir

In the first of a series of interviews by Phil England examining the situation in Iceland and the possible relevance of developments there to the UK, Phil talks to Pirate Party MP Birgitta Jonsdottir.

Doctors have always been over-worked, but that's not what's causing the recruitment crisis

The greatest reward of being a doctor - relating to patients as fellow complicated human beings - has been lost amidst the growth of tick-box, corporatised management that treats all doctors as if they were 'duffers'.

Could a free-for-all web culture be the death of the BBC?

High quality content costs money. As households are squeezed by austerity the corporation must demonstrate the links between its funding mechanism and the democratic service it provides. 

Can open data tackle corruption?

With the government publishing data too late, in a format you can’t easily analyse, and with so few details as to be almost meaningless, the sad answer is: not quite yet.

Move along now: the law barring thousands of people from public spaces

Police now have free rein to create “dispersal zones” in public areas, allowing them to ban people for anything from street drinking to acting in a suspicious manner.

The sell offs George Osborne doesn't want you to know about

The Royal Mint, Met Office and Ordnance Survey may soon be up for grabs by private companies. Once they're gone, we'll never get them back. 

How to fix UK political party finance

The reform of political party finance is essential to address public mistrust. It could also benefit parties themselves and help refresh democracy. 

Britain’s recovery industry: profiting from austerity?

While government spending cuts continue to grab headlines, private companies are quietly making money from the psychological hardships generated by austerity.

Human rights, why should I care? Thalidomide and other stories

Three real life cases from RightsInfo illuminate why human rights matter.

Does the UK really need 'wealth creators' and 'hardworking people'?

The two phrases, so beloved of politicians, stem from a fundamental shift in the role of the worker in post-industrial Britain.

Narrowing the gap between policy and delivery

Unless our government improves its capacity to deliver on its promises, we will not address the sense of disconnection between the people and those in office.

Labour's choice: neoliberalism or more neoliberalism

The leadership candidates are promising support for business leaders and “wealth creators”, suggesting a return to the neoliberal agenda of the Blair years.

The sex abusers guarding Britain’s most vulnerable children

“They look at you like you’re a dog, making you strip is bang out of order.” The final shocking extract from Children Behind Bars.

The public has a right to memory

From broadcasting to libraries and museums, digitization is revolutionising the way we enjoy and share heritage. 

Tower Hamlets: a victory for democracy or a neocolonial coup?

The ousting of Lutfur Rahman suggests that we expect different levels of behaviour from Bangadeshi politicians and those of the general white British political culture.

TTIP: a week of victories

Pressure from those concerned that the EU-US trade deal would hand over too much power to foreign corporations has been working on both sides of the Atlantic.

Mothers and sons. On children who have died in UK prisons

Joseph Scholes and Adam Rickwood died within weeks of being placed in penal institutions. Carolyne Willow met the boys’ mothers, and tells their stories in her shocking book, Children Behind Bars.

Stop and search: young Londoners hold police to account

Nobody likes to be stopped, harassed and humiliated by the police. Young people are devising strategies to protect themselves.

Straightening Europe’s crooked timber into a democratic eurozone

Opposition to the direction of the Eurozone can be expressed through national democracies, for example through the election of Syriza, but this is now an inadequate form of political representation.

Taking racism seriously: Islamophobia, civil liberties and the state

Racism and Islamophobia are driven by the practices of the powerful. Self-proclaimed 'liberals' need to know this.

Prison, a treacherous place for a child

Thirty-three children have died in English child prisons since 1990. A powerful new book exposes how Britain’s most vulnerable children are routinely damaged by the state. 

Five politics classics every activist should know about

And they’re not all what you think...

Why Scotland should adopt the Land Value Tax

The Commission on Local Tax Reform was set up by the Scottish government in February 2015 to consider reform of local government taxation. In this article, submitted as written evidence to the Commission, Iain McLean makes the case for a land value tax (LVT).

Exploding the myth of ‘payment by results’

National Audit Office issues damning report on outsourcing model that claims to guarantee value for money.

The truth behind the Mail on Sunday's "facemask anarchists" story

The article grossly exaggerated the plans of grassroots political group Brick Lane Debates' for tomorrow's anti-austerity rally.

Still failing after all these years

Writers and producers of BBC television drama are being stifled by the corporation's top-down commissioning system. 

Magna Carta 800th anniversary: three contrasting videos

A message to England from America's Black Lives Matter, A talk under the oldest Yew in England, and might says it is right

Liberate Tate: the quiet sounds of art activism

A protest in Tate Modern's Turbine Hall challenged the art giant to reject BP sponsorship, helping remove the sheen of respectability that the oil industry works so hard to maintain.

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